Civics & Citizenship

In an ever-changing world, students can gain knowledge, insight and understanding of the multi-faceted society in which they live by witnessing first-hand the structure and practices of a large-scale, commercial community.

The rich multicultural history of the Market, which considers the diverse society that is Melbourne, promotes the development of inclusivity. Traders sell foods that celebrate universal events such as weddings. Meat merchants consider the faith-based restrictions of their customers by selling halal-certified meats. The Market celebrates national and international festivals and key calendar events such as Diwali,
Lunar New Year and Christmas, to name a few. Civility, respect, equity, justice and responsibility underpin all that the Queen Victoria Market stands for.

By visiting and immersing oneself in a day in the life of the Market, students can witness a dynamic and varied society, which spans locally, regionally, nationally and globally.

The Australian identity can be put under the microscope at the Queen Victoria Market, free for all to observe through taste, sight, sound and touch.

Please find our Activity Sheets here.

Design & Technology

A visit to the Queen Victoria Market engages students in exploration of ethical, legal, aesthetic and functional factors that inform the design processes in relation to food, architecture and sustainability. Through observation learning, students can consider the economic, environmental and social impacts of technological change and how the choice and use of technology may contribute to a sustainable future. This is evident in the 1,328 solar panels that were installed at the Market in 2003, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 369 tonnes each year.

The history of the landscape and buildings opens the Market up for architectural analysis and investigation and students are exposed to a range of tools, equipment and systems during their visit.

The Market stimulates the inquiry of plants and animals and how they are utilised for food, clothing and shelter. Community and sustainable needs are recognised with the availability of organic and biodynamic food and the conscious effort of the Queen Victoria Market community to recycle materials.

Food safety, preservation, preparation and presentation are at the core of the Queen Victoria Market’s image. Students are offered an opportunity to examine social, ethical, economic and sustainable factors in the development of food products. Multicultural understanding as well as provenance and seasonality of food can be investigated by talking to traders and exploring shop windows.

Please find our Activity Sheets here.

History

The Queen Victoria Market is one of Australia’s earliest developments and harbours stories of Melbourne’s settlement, gold rush, war years and immigration development. The Market promotes the understanding of societies, events, movements and developments that have shaped Australian culture.

The Queen Victoria Market is a symbol of how Melbourne has changed physically and culturally. Archaeologically, the Market is home to remains of the past, both architecturally, having acquired heritage listed status, and spiritually, having been partially built upon a cemetery.

Today, the Market promotes debate and encourages thinking about human values. Increasingly, the Market is sensitive to the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, their identity and the continuing contribution and value to our culture.

Students are welcomed with an immersive experience when exploring the Market, aided by an array of visual and literary stimulus both inside and outside the Market walls. Timelines, cause and effect, symbols and ideologies can easily be examined on-site.

Please find our Activity Sheets here.

Close
Go to Top